Scania to offer next level Battery Electric Vehicles

Scania will commence the production of its next level of battery-electric zero-emission regional trucks in Södertälje, Sweden. With updated urban battery electric vehicles including new green battery packs and e-adopted chassis, and services such as Scania Charging Access, Scania’s offer has now reached a maturity level that makes it attractive and relevant for a broad spectrum of customers, regardless of their transport assignments.

“Operating zero-emission trucks is no longer a privilege for the chosen few,” says Fredrik Allard, Senior Vice President and Head of E-mobility at Scania. “Scania’s offer now covers a wide span of applications and customer demands, while offering services that are lowering the threshold for a transformation towards fossil-free transports for the many.”

Scania’s next level of regional battery electric trucks have impressive numbers: gross train weights can be up to 64 tons, the range is up to 390 kilometres, the charging capacity is up to 375 kW and the top power levels – 400 or 450 kW (circa 610 hp) – are considerably higher than those sported by the majority of the conventional trucks out on the roads. 

“Apart from true long-haul operations, few buyers today cannot find what they need from a operational viewpoint,” says Allard. “Sure, there are still certain applications that are less prone to turn electric in the near future, but many buyers will be amazed when they realise what these trucks are capable of and their efficiency together with our digital services.”

Scania’s latest electric trucks are offered as both rigids and tractors. Both R- and S-series cabs are available. Ranges will, as always, vary with weight, operation, weather, driving style and so on, but a 27-tonne city tipper with six batteries can expect up to 350 km between each charging. One hour of charging will then add 270 km of range. And it does not take the highest available charge points with 350 kW for achieving reasonable charging times: a 130 kW charger will add 100 km of range in one hour for a truck that uses 1.3 kWh/km.

“We are a bit stuck on the concept of always filling from 10% to 100% as we do with diesel,” says Allard. “With battery-electric vehicles the mindset should be to charge for the required range instead: if you have 120 km to go to your home depot charger, it would be unnecessary to charge for more than that distance with some small extra margin.”

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